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\n \"Chopped<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Chopped Liver with Red Onion Jam<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Miriam Rinn – Kaplen JCC on the Palisiades, Tenafly, N.J. <\/div>\n \n
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I’ve been making chopped liver for decades, always following my father’s method. Chopped liver was his specialty and he prepared it for all family celebrations. He used beef, not chicken, liver, loads of chopped raw onions, and vegetable oil to bind it all together. Trust me, it’s delicious. This spring, I took a Passover cooking class at my JCC to get some new ideas and followed a different recipe for the chopped liver. It has a milder flavor than my father’s but it’s really good too. Just shows that you can always learn something new. I’m not sure that my dad would have liked it as much but he’d be delighted that I was still making chopped liver. <\/p>\n

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\n \"Mrs.<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mrs. Fishman\u2019s Coffee Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – Member at JCC Rockland and Director of Communications at JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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I met Jerry Fishman on a night out dancing at the Village Station, a gay bar in Dallas. He was a sophomore at SMU and I was a junior in high school. I recognized him right away as the guy who taught music at Temple Emanu El\u2019s Sunday school, where I was working off my \u201cscholarship\u201d for my teen trip to Israel. We must have hit it off, because in no time we were hanging out, dragging in on Sunday mornings to teach perhaps a bit worse for wear from the evening before. <\/p>\n

Both of us loved old movies, Gershwin, being Jewish, and cooking. One thing I recall a him baking was a coffee cake that I adored. It is buttery, simple and has cinnamon in it, so it was guaranteed to win my mom\u2019s heart. I was at his place the day when he called his mother for the recipe and gave him a hard time because she said to use two cubes of butter. I mean, everyone knows they\u2019re called sticks, right?<\/p>\n

I went off to college in New York and a year after I landed there, Jerry arrived in the Big Apple, seeking to break into theater like so many performers before him. We would hang out from time to time and I loved his partner, Stephen. By then, Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake, for that is what I had dubbed it, had become a regular, requested guest at Yom Kippur break fast whether I was at home or at school. <\/p>\n

After I graduated, I lost track of Jerry, as I moved around, began work, went back to school, and began a career. When I moved back to New York, I was married and pregnant. A week or so before I was due, I ran into Stephen in the subway, who while no longer with Jerry, filled me in on nearly a decade of their lives during a ride downtown, where he gave me Jerry\u2019s phone number. My son was born shortly after, and I called Jerry to let him know when the bris was being held. <\/p>\n

And of course, I made Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake to serve. After the ceremony, I excitedly related to Jerry that this cake with the cinnamon-nut topping was none other than THE famous Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. Instead of recognition, I got a puzzled look. <\/p>\n

\u201cYou know. Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. I mean, it\u2019s your mom\u2019s recipe!\u201d I waited for recognition. At this point, everyone in my family knows Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. Instead, I got, \u201cReally? I had no idea.\u201d <\/p>\n

It is, really. The one and only Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake, perfect for break fast, greeting a new baby, leftover with coffee\u2014and making memories.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Grandma<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Grandma Hoffman\u2019s Skinny Mushroom and Onion Kugel<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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People can argue like Talmudic scholars about kugel: what it is, how it should be made, whether it should be sweet. You know. Well, in our family, kugels were \u2013 still are \u2013 salty, crispy, savory and made with skinny noodles. It\u2019s how my grandma made it, also her sisters, my mother, her sisters. Me. Sweet kugels are wonderful, true enough, but this is a really good side dish with a meat or roasted chicken dinner! <\/p>\n

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\n \"Cauliflower<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Cauliflower soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Liran Shoseyov – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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This recipe is one of my favorites from Eyal Shani a famous Israeli chef recipe. I love that it is so easy to make and low in calories!<\/p>\n

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\n \"Baba<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Baba Mira’s Chicken Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Anita Winestock <\/div>\n \n
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This was definitely the smell of Shabbat in our home. <\/p>\n

My mum would be meticulous in skimming often and never boiling the soup so it would remain clear. When I was a young girl, kosher chickens were delivered with all the “extras” included… unfertilized eggs, “pipik”, neck, feet, etc. We used to go fishing in the soup for these delicacies but mum always shooed us away in case we would mess up her perfectly clear soup!<\/p>\n

Hers was truly an act of love and I am happy to share and pass on!<\/p>\n

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\n \"Mamaliga<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mamaliga with Mushroom Ragout<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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On days when I feel like cooking a meatless meal I sometimes make mamaliga. My grandma used to serve it, usually with a variety of crumbled cheese that I always thought was too salty, but which my mother loved. For the grandkids \u2013 maple syrup. Nothing old country about that! The best meals were when she served the mamaliga plain, with some kind of meat dish like brisket or stew, so the corn meal mush and the gravy would mix together into a burst of flavor pleasure. She never made it this way, with mushrooms, but I bet she would have loved it.<\/p>\n

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\n \"The<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n The First Jewish Catalogue Challah Recipe #2<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Dina Yakar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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Growing up, my mom would make challah for Rosh Hashanah and some Shabbatot throughout the year. It was so delicious and sweet and cakelike. My siblings and I all make this challah. My sister makes a bunch and freezes them. She has also changed the recipe a little by mixing flour and whole wheat flour. <\/p>\n

The recipe we use is recipe #2 from The First Jewish Catalogue, which was published in 1973, a do-it-yourself kit compiled and edited by Richard Siegel, Michael Strassfeld and Sharon Strassfeld. <\/p>\n

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\n \"Austrian<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Austrian Butter Cookies<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – JCC Rockland and JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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One of my best friends in middle school was the daughter and granddaughter of Holocaust survivors from Austria. I never learned their complete stories, but her father was an enormous man, bald and with a very visible scar\/dent in his head that I assumed was the result of his wartime travails. He had a booming voice and while initially he frightened me, he was a warm, sweet natured man. <\/p>\n

Her grandmother was quite a cook, and used to bake all the time when we were in middle school, but she was one of those intuitive cooks who didn\u2019t measure anything. But we all loved her butter cookies so much that my friend followed after her, noting exact amounts so that we could replicate them. I\u2019m glad she did and whenever I make the recipe, I\u2019m reminded of her grandmother and that somehow baking these cookies recaptures a little of a past and a culture that was nearly lost. <\/p>\n

Her grandmother also used to roll out this cookie dough to make a traditional German plum tart. She doubled the recipe and made a lattice crust, and it was always quite a thing to behold.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Savta<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Savta (Grandma) Frannie\u2019s Apple Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n David Ackerman – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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My mother, Frannie Ackerman, o\u201dh, was not an adventurous cook, but her apple cake was famous. It\u2019s a fail-safe \u201cgo-to\u201d recipe for me and my three sisters. When I told my three children who were all together this past Rosh Hashana I was going to bake something for dessert, they all responded, \u201csavta cake!\u201d<\/p>\n

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\n \"Key<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Key Lime Pie<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Lisa Zbar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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I’m a Floridian and I remember my family using this recipe, published in The Miami Herald in 1949. Sublime.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Freekeh<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Freekeh Tabouli with Fennel, Celery, Mango, Red Onion, Fresh Herbs, Lemon-Tahini and More\u2026<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Shlomo Schwartz – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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Although today I live in one of the busiest cities in the world, I was actually born in the desert part of Israel in the city of Beer Sheva. I moved to New York in 2010 and decided to fulfill an old passion, cooking. I graduated from the CKCA culinary school in New York City, worked at some of the finest restaurants there such as The Prime Grill, Porter House and Boulud Sud, and at Catit and Blue Sky restaurants by Chef Meir Adoni in Tel Aviv.<\/p>\n

At 2012, I established Your Soul Kitchen, curating Israeli culinary and cultural experiences, including culinary trips to Israel, educational programs, and cooking classes.<\/p>\n

When people ask me what kind of food I like to cook, as a good Jew I answer with a question, and say, \u201cThe real question is, \u2018What do people like to eat?\u2019 Because cooking is not for the sake of cooking, it\u2019s all about the people that eat it!!! Happiness, excitement, and joy are the real food I like to cook\u201d<\/p>\n

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\n \"As<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n As Close as You Can Get to Entenmann’s Iced Banana Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Dina Yakar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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One year on Thanksgiving, my mother made banana bread with chocolate chips as a dessert to bring to my sister\u2019s house. While her banana bread is good, I don\u2019t like it with chocolate chips. Also, have you ever had the Entenmann\u2019s Banana Iced Cake? It was my favorite cake as a child. A few years ago, I found out that it had become a \u201cseasonal\u201d item, much to my disappointment. Well, my mom\u2019s banana bread just isn\u2019t the same as the Entenmann\u2019s cake (sorry, Mom!).
\nMy mom and I both live in Queens, N.Y. and my sister lives in Teaneck, N.J., about a 20-mile drive. On our way to Teaneck that Thanksgiving, we picked up my brother and his then-girlfriend who lived on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. We often did this as he doesn\u2019t drive and it only added 10 minutes to our route. In good traffic, it should take about 25-30 minutes to get to my sister\u2019s house from Queens, but on that day, it took us three hours! We were so hungry.
\nIt got so bad that we broke into the banana bread!
\nThe following year, we came prepared. We brought bagels and drinks so we wouldn\u2019t eat the dessert we brought. That year, it took us only an hour to get there!
\nI adapted this recipe from one online for muffins and it tastes just like the Entenmann\u2019s cake.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Lekach\"<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Lekach<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yuliya Mazur – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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This is the one thing my father prefers over any desert. And I know why. It\u2019s the one his mother made so often. My grandma was an amazing cook. Oh, I know every grandma was the best. But mine \u2013 she was truly amazing! When she was baking a cake, my friends must have had some premonitions \u2013 they just showed up at my door.<\/p>\n

I have made the lekach so many times already, but there wasn\u2019t one, when I wouldn\u2019t remember her. I love cooking. I consider myself a pretty good cook. But I have a long road to go to reach the level of my grandmother \u2013 Surah bat Leizer. May her memory be for a blessing forever.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Yalangi<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Yalangi (Stuffed Grape Leaves)<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Shahd Baeij – Tucson JCC <\/div>\n \n
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Shahd Baeij is a recent immigrant from Syria to the Tucson community. A partnership between the city’s International Rescue Committee and the Tucson JCC led to her teaching cooking classes at the J, where she shares her love for the food of her native land with the community. <\/p>\n

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\n \"Chicken<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Chicken Fricassee<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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When my mother made Chicken Fricassee it was like getting a dinner gift because it had something for everyone: chicken wings, which my brothers and I loved best. Meatballs for my father. Gizzards, because that\u2019s how her mother, my grandma taught her. Potatoes, which we regarded as an extra treasure because it soaked up the savory gravy. A load of shmaltz and onions. I know this dish is considered peasant\u2019s fare by some, but it was holiday festive for us. My mother made it for Passover and Rosh Hashanah. And in between. And now, so do I.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Ancestral<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Ancestral Food<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yuliya Mazur – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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I love the idea of making foods that our ancestors ate long ago.<\/p>\n

Here\u2019s a salad that opens your palate to beautiful flavors, very easy to make and comes to us from ancient times. It is one of my favorite salads, which looks totally unpretentious, but is packed with flavor. Unfortunately, the prohibitive cost of pine nuts here, in New York, prevents me from making it as often as I would love to, but for a special occasion, it is just great.<\/p>\n

Jerusalem pine nuts, called kadam, are considered the best, their fame coming to us from the first century C.E.<\/p>\n