{"status":"ok","elements":"
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\n \"Feta<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Feta Borekas<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Michael Solomonov – Chef at Zahav and part owner of Abe Fisher, Dizengoff and Federal Donuts <\/div>\n \n
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Growing up, my Savta Mati didn’t speak English and I didn’t speak Hebrew or Bulgarian, so borekas formed the bond between us.\u00a0 As a kid, I would watch my grandmother roll out the dough by hand.\u00a0 Years later when I returned to Israel as a young adult, my first kitchen job was in a bakery where they made borekas in batches so large that it took four bakers to lift the block of dough.\u00a0 During my time at the bakery, I would often think about Savta Mati.\u00a0 I loved that I was making borekas for a living, and was so incredibly proud to be part of a tradition that she had brought with her from Bulgaria.\u00a0 It was so great to be working in a place that was so much a part of daily life in Israel.\u00a0 It changed my life, and it made me feel like I had a home.<\/p>\n

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\n \"My<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n My Cousin Essie\u2019s Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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My cousin Essie wasn\u2019t a good cook. Even she laughed at her matzo balls, which conjured images of a ball of food falling out of a plate, bouncing out the window into the city streets and out into the countryside. But she concocted this simple, fabulous soup, which I make often, especially in the winter, because it is so comforting. It\u2019s as thick as cholent, loaded with beans and dried peas, plus a few extras. Sometimes I add fresh carrots, onions and celery.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Matzah-roni<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Matzah-roni and Cheese<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Lina Zerbarini – Sid Jacobson JCC <\/div>\n \n
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My kids look forward to Passover for matzah-roni and cheese (if not other food!).
\nI make this every year for our JCC staff Passover luncheon. It’s become legendary!<\/p>\n

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\n \"One-Pot<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n One-Pot Chicken Broccoli Alfredo<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Julee Sheehan – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
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Our friends at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC in Newton, Mass., say, “it’s super easy to make and clean up after.”<\/p>\n

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\n \"Passover<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Passover Sponge Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Stephanie Dworkin – Betty & Milton Katz JCC <\/div>\n \n
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https:\/\/katzjcc.org\/jblog-passover\/<\/p>\n

I shared some details about the significance of this recipe in my blog post, but to summarize: this is my grandmother’s recipe. She now leaves it to my mom and I to prepare, but she’s always in the kitchen supervising to make sure we follow the recipe correctly.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Orange-scented<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Orange-scented sufganiyot<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – JCC Rockland & JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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In 2013, Chanukah and Thanksgiving collided for a once-in-a-lifetime holiday mashup. In celebration, I decided to create sufganiyot\u2014fried doughnuts that are synonymous with Chanukah in Israel\u2014with pumpkin cream. My daughter, Lily, and our friend, Chana, helped put them together.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Nana\u2019s<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Nana\u2019s Rocky Road Brownies<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Margie Sockol – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
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The grandkids love to help Nana bake these delicious brownies sneaking in a few marshmallows or licks from the bowl. When the smell of these brownies baking in the oven is in the air everyone stands around waiting to get their hands on a piece. And then when Nana served them at holiday time there was most often a piece missing from the pan due to someone (usually me) not being able to wait. Once when I missed my opportunity to steal a piece, my nephew (at five years old) asked, “What happened to Auntie Margie\u2014there is no missing piece?”<\/p>\n

Enjoy the home-baked yummy goodness that will certainly be passed down from generation to generation in our family.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Butternut<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Butternut Squash and Cranberry Salad<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Kimberly Bartlett – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
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I have started to make this as a healthy side dish to many family gatherings over the past few years and it’s a great hit with those watching diets and those looking for some new flavors!<\/p>\n

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\n \"Creme<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Creme Caramel<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Arielle Cline – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
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Passed along from a friend and then became the favorite of a father\/grandfather.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Mamaliga<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mamaliga with Mushroom Ragout<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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On days when I feel like cooking a meatless meal I sometimes make mamaliga. My grandma used to serve it, usually with a variety of crumbled cheese that I always thought was too salty, but which my mother loved. For the grandkids \u2013 maple syrup. Nothing old country about that! The best meals were when she served the mamaliga plain, with some kind of meat dish like brisket or stew, so the corn meal mush and the gravy would mix together into a burst of flavor pleasure. She never made it this way, with mushrooms, but I bet she would have loved it.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Lilya’<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Lilya’ Summer Beet Borscht<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Liz Alpern – The Gefilteria <\/div>\n \n
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One summer day, Jeffrey and I headed to Little Odessa in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. We were visiting our business partner Jackie\u2019s ninety-two-year-old Russian-born great-aunt, Lilya. She had immigrated to Brighton Beach from the Soviet Union in 1989. Lilya was known for her borscht, and she\u2019d invited us to spend time with her while she salted and seasoned three varieties of the soup. At ninety-two, she was extraordinary, foisting shots of vodka on us and showering us with words of wisdom. We left Brighton Beach inspired and feeling lucky to have met her. She passed away a couple of years later. We developed this recipe with her in mind.<\/p>\n

This beet borscht is perfect served chilled on summer days or served hot in the colder months. The ideal borscht, writes Aleksandar Hemon in the New Yorker of his Bosnian family traditions \u201ccontains everything . . . and it can be refrigerated and reheated in perpetuity, always better the next day . . . The crucial ingredient . . . is a large, hungry family, surviving together.\u201d Jeffrey thinks that this recipe should utilize rossel (the brine from fermented beets, otherwise known as beet kvass) instead of vinegar to add tang, since traditionally borscht\u2019s coveted sour flavor was cultivated by first fermenting the beets. But I disagree. I like the flavor that vinegar adds, even if it isn\u2019t as Old World. This recipe uses vinegar (I won!), but if you\u2019d like to be more old school and first wait a week to ferment your beets, follow the Beet and Ginger Kvass recipe (page 290 in The Gefilte Manifesto) but omit the ginger. And while this recipe calls for roasting beets and adding them to the soup, it also tastes great without roasted beets. Just cut the beet amount to 1 pound if omitting the roasting step.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Baba<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Baba Mira’s Chicken Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Anita Winestock <\/div>\n \n
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This was definitely the smell of Shabbat in our home. <\/p>\n

My mum would be meticulous in skimming often and never boiling the soup so it would remain clear. When I was a young girl, kosher chickens were delivered with all the “extras” included… unfertilized eggs, “pipik”, neck, feet, etc. We used to go fishing in the soup for these delicacies but mum always shooed us away in case we would mess up her perfectly clear soup!<\/p>\n

Hers was truly an act of love and I am happy to share and pass on!<\/p>\n

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\n \"Mushroom<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mushroom & Barley Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Liz Alpern – The Gefilteria <\/div>\n \n
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Part of what made mushrooms\u2014one of the primary flavoring agents of Ashkenazi cuisine\u2014so popular was the fact that they could be foraged from the forests, free of charge. They also possess a meaty, umami character. The best foragers, often peasant women, would gather extras after a rain spell and sell them at markets.<\/p>\n

Among the types of mushrooms eaten by Jews in Europe, porcinis (often referred to as c\u00e8pes, from the French) were quite common. Even after Jews immigrated to North America, where they relied mostly on North American ingredients for cooking, there was a robust mushroom trade for imported porcinis from the Old World. \u201cMushrooms were one of the few things they [Jews] bothered to bring in from the Old Country,\u201d explains food historian Jane Ziegelman. \u201cThere was even a little mushroom wholesale district on Houston Street.\u201d<\/p>\n

This recipe is best made with porcinis, both dried and fresh, but a variety of mushrooms, including shiitakes and even portobellos, will taste great. The dried mushrooms give this soup particular depth. Also note that the barley is cooked separately from the broth, to <\/p>\n

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\n \"Slow<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Slow Cooked Chicken & Beef Meatballs<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Sandy Leibowitz – Foodie and food blogger <\/div>\n \n
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My mom is a great cook. Which is really ironic, because I have repeatedly heard the story about how she used to come home from school and see my grandmother throwing spaghetti on the wall to see if it was done. (She no longer does this, and is an excellent cook.) <\/p>\n

Clearly, my mom\u2019s first experiences of cooking were not the most accurate. She later learned to cook from my dad\u2014and it paid off! <\/p>\n

This recipe is an adaptation of a meal I will never forget. My mom kept them rather simple and cooked green beans in the sauce with them, and they were so comforting. Here, I use a crockpot to do the bulk of the work. It’s wonderful to come home to this delicious meal waiting for you.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Chicken<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Chicken Fricassee<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
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When my mother made Chicken Fricassee it was like getting a dinner gift because it had something for everyone: chicken wings, which my brothers and I loved best. Meatballs for my father. Gizzards, because that\u2019s how her mother, my grandma taught her. Potatoes, which we regarded as an extra treasure because it soaked up the savory gravy. A load of shmaltz and onions. I know this dish is considered peasant\u2019s fare by some, but it was holiday festive for us. My mother made it for Passover and Rosh Hashanah. And in between. And now, so do I.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Mrs.<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mrs. Fishman\u2019s Coffee Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – Member at JCC Rockland and Director of Communications at JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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I met Jerry Fishman on a night out dancing at the Village Station, a gay bar in Dallas. He was a sophomore at SMU and I was a junior in high school. I recognized him right away as the guy who taught music at Temple Emanu El\u2019s Sunday school, where I was working off my \u201cscholarship\u201d for my teen trip to Israel. We must have hit it off, because in no time we were hanging out, dragging in on Sunday mornings to teach perhaps a bit worse for wear from the evening before. <\/p>\n

Both of us loved old movies, Gershwin, being Jewish, and cooking. One thing I recall a him baking was a coffee cake that I adored. It is buttery, simple and has cinnamon in it, so it was guaranteed to win my mom\u2019s heart. I was at his place the day when he called his mother for the recipe and gave him a hard time because she said to use two cubes of butter. I mean, everyone knows they\u2019re called sticks, right?<\/p>\n

I went off to college in New York and a year after I landed there, Jerry arrived in the Big Apple, seeking to break into theater like so many performers before him. We would hang out from time to time and I loved his partner, Stephen. By then, Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake, for that is what I had dubbed it, had become a regular, requested guest at Yom Kippur break fast whether I was at home or at school. <\/p>\n

After I graduated, I lost track of Jerry, as I moved around, began work, went back to school, and began a career. When I moved back to New York, I was married and pregnant. A week or so before I was due, I ran into Stephen in the subway, who while no longer with Jerry, filled me in on nearly a decade of their lives during a ride downtown, where he gave me Jerry\u2019s phone number. My son was born shortly after, and I called Jerry to let him know when the bris was being held. <\/p>\n

And of course, I made Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake to serve. After the ceremony, I excitedly related to Jerry that this cake with the cinnamon-nut topping was none other than THE famous Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. Instead of recognition, I got a puzzled look. <\/p>\n

\u201cYou know. Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. I mean, it\u2019s your mom\u2019s recipe!\u201d I waited for recognition. At this point, everyone in my family knows Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake. Instead, I got, \u201cReally? I had no idea.\u201d <\/p>\n

It is, really. The one and only Mrs. Fishman\u2019s coffee cake, perfect for break fast, greeting a new baby, leftover with coffee\u2014and making memories.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Auntie<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Auntie Nunny’s Coffee Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Susan Fay – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
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My mother’s recipe that we bring to family events, it disappears in minutes!<\/p>\n

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\n Lisa Zbar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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I’m a Floridian and I remember my family using this recipe, published in The Miami Herald in 1949. Sublime.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Root<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Root Vegetable Latkes<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Liz Alpern – The Gefilteria <\/div>\n \n
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Hanukkah is the time of year I feel the most Jewish. While the rest of New York is feverishly buying gifts and planning big family meals, I\u2019m quietly grating potatoes by the light of the menorah. In contrast to so many other Jewish holidays, Hanukkah celebrations are relaxed and loose. It feels like all I need to do is fry up some latkes, and I\u2019m in the perfect holiday spirit. <\/p>\n

The latke as we know it took quite a culinary journey, beginning centuries ago in Italy as a cheese fritter fried in olive oil, then moving northeast, where it morphed into a buckwheat and rye pancake, and then a turnip fritter fried in schmaltz. Finally, in the mid-nineteenth century, the potato took over. This latke includes root vegetables alongside the classic potatoes, which lend extra color and flavor to the mix. Note that if you prefer a pure potato latke, simply substitute 6 small russet potatoes (about 3 pounds) for the veggies in this recipe. The root vegetable version is a bit lighter and more fragile than the purely potato version, so take care when forming into latkes for frying.<\/p>\n

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\n \"Mandel<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mandel Bread<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Debbie Golden – Shimon and Sara Birnbaum JCC <\/div>\n \n
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This recipe for mandel bread was my grandmother, Fanny\u2019s. My grandmother (my mother\u2019s mother) was one of my favorite people in my life\u2026she was the sweetest Jewish grandma you could want! She became affectionately known as \u201cMama Fanny.\u201d Like many Jewish women who came from Eastern Europe, my grandmother (born in Russia) did not have this recipe written down, but used various \u201cmeasuring\u201d devices for the ingredients, including a Breakstone sour cream glass that many people may remember. It wasn\u2019t until one day when my oldest sister, Eileen, watched my grandmother prepare the mandel bread that we had an \u201cofficial\u201d recipe!<\/p>\n

So Mama Fanny\u2019s mandel bread recipe is a family favorite, one that I prepare for Rosh Hashanah every year as well as other times throughout the year. My husband and my two grown children and my son-in-law love it, and several times a year a batch makes its way to Seattle, where my son, Brian, lives. He refuses to share it with any of his friends!<\/p>\n

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\n Cauliflower soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Liran Shoseyov – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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This recipe is one of my favorites from Eyal Shani a famous Israeli chef recipe. I love that it is so easy to make and low in calories!<\/p>\n

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\n \"Boreka<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Boreka Dough<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Michael Solomonov – Chef at Zahav and part owner of Abe Fisher, Dizengoff and Federal Donuts <\/div>\n \n
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Mike shared this recipe with us; it’s the dough that goes with the borekas he helped to make with his savta (grandmother) when growing up. <\/p>\n

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\n \"Mandelbrodt\"<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Mandelbrodt<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Harriet Blank – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
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About 45 years ago we hired a new rabbi. His young wife had this amazing recipe for Mandelbrodt. It has since become a classic in my family.<\/p>\n

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\n Chopped Liver with Red Onion Jam<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Miriam Rinn – Kaplen JCC on the Palisiades, Tenafly, N.J. <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

I’ve been making chopped liver for decades, always following my father’s method. Chopped liver was his specialty and he prepared it for all family celebrations. He used beef, not chicken, liver, loads of chopped raw onions, and vegetable oil to bind it all together. Trust me, it’s delicious. This spring, I took a Passover cooking class at my JCC to get some new ideas and followed a different recipe for the chopped liver. It has a milder flavor than my father’s but it’s really good too. Just shows that you can always learn something new. I’m not sure that my dad would have liked it as much but he’d be delighted that I was still making chopped liver. <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Kadeh\u2013Kurdish<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Kadeh\u2013Kurdish Cheese Bread<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yael Mazor-Garfinkle – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Kadeh is a traditional dish of Kurdish Jews. My father grew up in Jerusalem to Kurdish-born immigrants from Zakho, Iraq. Kadeh was a special treat in our family. On Shavuot, our Mizrahi-Ashkenazi family would eat kadeh alongside blintzes.<\/p>\n

One of my favorite memories of my late uncle was preparing kadeh for him a few years ago. My dad sent us this recipe while he was away in Israel so that my husband and I could make kadeh for his aging brother. We rushed to my uncle’s house after work so he would have fresh kadeh waiting for him when he got home from Shavuot services. He was so delighted to come home to this surprise and told us how much it reminded him of his childhood. My uncle passed away earlier this year, so this memory is a particularly treasured one.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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<\/div>\n <\/div>\n<\/div>\n
\n
\n \t\t\t
\n \"Grandma<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Grandma Anna’s Golden Chicken Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Paul Emery Fireman – JCC of Greater Pittsburgh <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Chicken Soup was my grandma’s cure-all. It was the special Litvak (Lithuanian) medicine that was dispensed at the slightest sign of a sore throat, cough or chest cold. It was everyone’s all-time favorite. It was also the one staple on our Shabbat table and every Jewish holiday I can remember. The soup she lovingly prepared was always a golden colored both, a liquid gold, that was as flavorful as it was clear. The secret to her soup was a fresh Kosher chicken that she worked over carefully to remove any feathers and pincus (feather ends) carelessly left behind by the shoichet (the butcher). The other secret was the pupik (the gizzard) and the gorgol (the neck) that was left in the pot and cooked with the soup to provide an extra bit of flavor. She would strain off the schmaltz (chicken fat) and serve the soup with matzoh balls or extra wide egg lokshen (noodles). She would also serve with a fresh baked challah bread or matzoh on Passover that we would generously spread with butter, jelly or honey. She never used a recipe, only adding a pinch of salt, a dash of pepper or an extra couple of carrots and onions as needed. My cousin Cari gave me this recipe that is as close to my grandmother\u2019s creation as we can get. I miss my grandmother and this amazing soup is as close as I can get to her memory.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n
\n \t\t\t
\n \"Spinach-Lentil<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Spinach-Lentil soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Korrinn Lubarsky – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Now that it’s colder, this is a “really tasty soup,” say our friends at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC in Newton, Mass. <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Savta<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Savta (Grandma) Frannie\u2019s Apple Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n David Ackerman – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

My mother, Frannie Ackerman, o\u201dh, was not an adventurous cook, but her apple cake was famous. It\u2019s a fail-safe \u201cgo-to\u201d recipe for me and my three sisters. When I told my three children who were all together this past Rosh Hashana I was going to bake something for dessert, they all responded, \u201csavta cake!\u201d<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Pumpkin<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Pumpkin Pastry Cream<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – JCC Association of North America & JCC Rockland <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

In 2013, Chanukah and Thanksgiving collided for a once-in-a-lifetime holiday mashup. In celebration, I decided to create sufganiyot\u2014fried doughnuts that are synonymous with Chanukah in Israel\u2014with pumpkin cream. My daughter, Lily, and our friend, Chana, helped put them together.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Ancestral<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Ancestral Food<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yuliya Mazur – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

I love the idea of making foods that our ancestors ate long ago.<\/p>\n

Here\u2019s a salad that opens your palate to beautiful flavors, very easy to make and comes to us from ancient times. It is one of my favorite salads, which looks totally unpretentious, but is packed with flavor. Unfortunately, the prohibitive cost of pine nuts here, in New York, prevents me from making it as often as I would love to, but for a special occasion, it is just great.<\/p>\n

Jerusalem pine nuts, called kadam, are considered the best, their fame coming to us from the first century C.E.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Freekeh<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Freekeh Tabouli with Fennel, Celery, Mango, Red Onion, Fresh Herbs, Lemon-Tahini and More\u2026<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Shlomo Schwartz – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Although today I live in one of the busiest cities in the world, I was actually born in the desert part of Israel in the city of Beer Sheva. I moved to New York in 2010 and decided to fulfill an old passion, cooking. I graduated from the CKCA culinary school in New York City, worked at some of the finest restaurants there such as The Prime Grill, Porter House and Boulud Sud, and at Catit and Blue Sky restaurants by Chef Meir Adoni in Tel Aviv.<\/p>\n

At 2012, I established Your Soul Kitchen, curating Israeli culinary and cultural experiences, including culinary trips to Israel, educational programs, and cooking classes.<\/p>\n

When people ask me what kind of food I like to cook, as a good Jew I answer with a question, and say, \u201cThe real question is, \u2018What do people like to eat?\u2019 Because cooking is not for the sake of cooking, it\u2019s all about the people that eat it!!! Happiness, excitement, and joy are the real food I like to cook\u201d<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Chocolate<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Chocolate Rugelach<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Kim Bartlett – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

I have brought this simple dessert snack to many holiday gatherings and people have enjoyed the bite sized version and simple flavors!<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Easy<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Easy holiday mix<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Jenny Gomeringer – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Every time we make this, the kids always talk about how it\u2019s their favorite snack. It\u2019s gotten such a following that we now triple the recipe for family gatherings!<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Yalangi<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Yalangi (Stuffed Grape Leaves)<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Shahd Baeij – Tucson JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Shahd Baeij is a recent immigrant from Syria to the Tucson community. A partnership between the city’s International Rescue Committee and the Tucson JCC led to her teaching cooking classes at the J, where she shares her love for the food of her native land with the community. <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n
\n \t\t\t
\n \"Rye<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Rye Bread<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yuliya Mazur – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

My grandmother, who lived all her life in a village in the Middle of Russia, and had 10 children (two of her elder sons were killed on the fronts of World War II) made her own bread almost until her late seventies. Of course, the bread was never from the while flour, except for the holidays. It was too expensive for this poor family. Commercial yeast was also not readily available. Rye flour and whole wheat were more affordable, which sounds very ironic in 2017 America. During the war things, of course, were even worse, although at least being “on the land” in an area where the Germans were not in the village, but close enough, they were not starving totally, utilizing anything edible that was left over anywhere in the house or garden. <\/p>\n

Lately, I have developed a passion for baking bread. This one, although not the same my babushka Sasha was making, I am hoping, is close enough. May her memory be for a blessing for all her descendants.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Taco<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Taco Lasagne<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Korrinn Lubarsky – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Our friends at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC in Newton, Mass. say, “It is just super yummy! :)”<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Mom’s<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Mom’s Lamb Stew<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Robin Ballin – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

My mother got this recipe from her mother. They were born in Germany. My mom made lamb stew about twice a year, only when it was really cold out.<\/p>\n

I don’t think my mom ever used a spice in her life other than salt, garlic powder or ginger. Lamb stew is one of those recipes that has enough flavorful ingredients that you can get away without the extra spices! She always told me the secret to a good lamb stew is the sweet potatoes. I have carried on the tradition of twice a year, and I think of my mom whenever I make it.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Pistachio<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Pistachio Crusted Salmon<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Shlomo Schwartz – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

As many of us, I as well grew up eating salmon all the time…. and now when I am the host I was thinking how can I elevate this popular fish and make it festive, especially for a Shabbat or holiday table. That is when I came up with this flavorful and beautiful dish.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Lekach\"<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
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\n Lekach<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Yuliya Mazur – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

This is the one thing my father prefers over any desert. And I know why. It\u2019s the one his mother made so often. My grandma was an amazing cook. Oh, I know every grandma was the best. But mine \u2013 she was truly amazing! When she was baking a cake, my friends must have had some premonitions \u2013 they just showed up at my door.<\/p>\n

I have made the lekach so many times already, but there wasn\u2019t one, when I wouldn\u2019t remember her. I love cooking. I consider myself a pretty good cook. But I have a long road to go to reach the level of my grandmother \u2013 Surah bat Leizer. May her memory be for a blessing forever.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Austrian<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Austrian Butter Cookies<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Marla Cohen – JCC Rockland and JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

One of my best friends in middle school was the daughter and granddaughter of Holocaust survivors from Austria. I never learned their complete stories, but her father was an enormous man, bald and with a very visible scar\/dent in his head that I assumed was the result of his wartime travails. He had a booming voice and while initially he frightened me, he was a warm, sweet natured man. <\/p>\n

Her grandmother was quite a cook, and used to bake all the time when we were in middle school, but she was one of those intuitive cooks who didn\u2019t measure anything. But we all loved her butter cookies so much that my friend followed after her, noting exact amounts so that we could replicate them. I\u2019m glad she did and whenever I make the recipe, I\u2019m reminded of her grandmother and that somehow baking these cookies recaptures a little of a past and a culture that was nearly lost. <\/p>\n

Her grandmother also used to roll out this cookie dough to make a traditional German plum tart. She doubled the recipe and made a lattice crust, and it was always quite a thing to behold.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \"Tomato<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Tomato Soup Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Will Winer – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

It’s a great holiday cake.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Grandma<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Grandma Hoffman\u2019s Skinny Mushroom and Onion Kugel<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Ronnie Fein <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

People can argue like Talmudic scholars about kugel: what it is, how it should be made, whether it should be sweet. You know. Well, in our family, kugels were \u2013 still are \u2013 salty, crispy, savory and made with skinny noodles. It\u2019s how my grandma made it, also her sisters, my mother, her sisters. Me. Sweet kugels are wonderful, true enough, but this is a really good side dish with a meat or roasted chicken dinner! <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"The<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n The First Jewish Catalogue Challah Recipe #2<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Dina Yakar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Growing up, my mom would make challah for Rosh Hashanah and some Shabbatot throughout the year. It was so delicious and sweet and cakelike. My siblings and I all make this challah. My sister makes a bunch and freezes them. She has also changed the recipe a little by mixing flour and whole wheat flour. <\/p>\n

The recipe we use is recipe #2 from The First Jewish Catalogue, which was published in 1973, a do-it-yourself kit compiled and edited by Richard Siegel, Michael Strassfeld and Sharon Strassfeld. <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \"Apple-Blueberry<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Apple-Blueberry Oatmeal<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Sally Scharff – Barshop JCC of San Antonio <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

This is based on a recipe from Eat to Live by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. I read his book and changed my diet to mostly fruits and vegetables, and I have so much energy now! Every time I make this recipe my family loves it. My son-in-law says it’s better than a restaurant. It is also delicious with peaches. When peaches are in season, I slice them and freeze them in bags, and just use 1\/2 cup blueberries.<\/p>\n

This breakfast will make you happy!<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \t\t\t
\n \"Date<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Date Sticks<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Elizabeth Kaplan – JCCs of Greater Boston <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

This recipe is from my great-grandmother, and I remember it being made for my family by my grandmother. She passed away about a year ago – but toward the end of her life, she created handwritten recipe books for my sister and me that have all of her family favorites. It is incredibly special to have the items that felt most important for her to pass on – her favorite foods.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \"Fall<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Fall Harvest Pasta<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Amanda Glucklich – Boulder JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

The squash, onion and herbs that were used for this recipe were all grown at the Boulder JCC camp’s Milk & Honey Farm. This dish was prepared at one of the many farm-to-table programs that are created to engage the community and was taught by the farm educator, who is a former cook.<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \"Sausage,<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n Sausage, Bean, and Kale Soup<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Katelyn – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

Our friends at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC in Newton, Mass. say, “It’s delicious especially on a cold day!”<\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
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\n \"One<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n One Pot Chili Mac and Cheese<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Korrinn Lubarsky – Leventhal-Sidman JCC <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n

“It’s really delicious,” say our friends at the Leventhal-Sidman JCC in Newton, Mass. <\/p>\n

\n View Recipe<\/a>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n <\/div>\n\n \n
\n Fb<\/a>\n Tw<\/a>\n ln<\/a>\n \t\t\t\tPi<\/a>\n\t\t\t\t <\/div>\n \n \n
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\n \"As<\/a> <\/div>\n \n
\n
\n As Close as You Can Get to Entenmann’s Iced Banana Cake<\/a>\n <\/div>\n \n
\n Dina Yakar – JCC Association of North America <\/div>\n \n
\n